nortel option 11 pbx at home
a few years ago i started getting interested in telephony, and one of my first big projects was to build up my own meridian digital pbx board by board for hobby use. it has been a lot of fun and very interesting but there was definitely a learning curve to it. i decided to put this page together to both document what i have done so that i dont forget, and to provide perhaps a more structured introduction to the meridian for the telephony hobbyist with no prior experience.

the model range

the nortel meridian range has been around for a while and is fairly comprehensive. meridian systems range from little single cabinet switches with a few as 20 or 30 lines, all the way up to room sized switches with thousands of lines. the smallest member of the meridian range is the option 11 line. it runs on a few amps of ordinary 120 VAC and weighs less than a hundred pounds fully loaded. these attributes make it perfectly suited for residential use.
there are a few different vintages of the option 11. the original option 11 systems used an NTAK01 processor card which seems to have a zilog Z180 processor as the system CPU. it is very slow and runs fairly old software revisions. the original option 11 systems were followed by the option 11e system, which came equipped with a refreshed NTBK45 processor card. here, the system CPU was updated to a motorola 68020. the performance of the option 11e processor is reasonable and these make fine systems for hobby use. the final iteration of the option 11 line was the option 11c, which again offered a refreshed processor card, the NTDK20. NTDK20 cards use the motorola 68040 processor. more modern vintages of the NTDK20 remain the processor card for new option 11 systems shipping from nortel today but the older vintages of this card are starting to appear on the gray market at very attractive prices for the hobbyist. pretty much everything i will discuss on this site is applicable to all option 11 processor cards except where otherwise noted.
you could very well get lucky and find a complete option 11 system for sale at a fair price, perhaps two or three hundred dollars depending on configuration. the price is especially fair if the seller happens to know what the administrator password is. i built my system up from boards, however, and i will spend a lot of time discussing them. i think it was more fun building it up piecewise, and there is definitely the potential for cost savings over buying a complete system. perhaps most importantly, you can learn a lot about the internals of the system building it up from boards than you might otherwise.
from the ground up, an option 11 system consists of the following components

  • at least one chassis which will include
    • one backplane
    • one connector panel
    • one power supply
  • a system controller card
  • any number of peripheral cards which may include
    • analog and digital station cards
    • analog, digital, and e&m trunk cards
    • serial cards and tone generators
    • isdn line cards
    • meridian mail

the table below sums up the most common and useful parts for the option 11.

NTAK01 option 11 system controller card
NTBK45 option 11e system controller card
NTDK20 option 11c system controller card
NTAK02 sdi/dch quad serial port card
NTAK03 tds/dtr tone and digit switch card
NTAK09 dti/pri t1 card supported on all releases
NTRB21 tmdi t1 card with integrated ddch supported on rls 24+ only
NT8D02 digital line card
NT8D03 analog line card without message waiting
NT8D09 analog line card with message waiting
NT8D14 universal analog trunk card
NT8D15 e&m trunk card
NTAK04 120 vac power supply
NTAK11 11 slot single shelf chassis
NTAK20 clock controller mates to NTAK09
NTAK93 dchi pri d-channel handler mates to NTAK09
NTBK51 ddch improved pri d-channel handler mates to NTAK09
NTAG26 multifrequency receiver card
NTBK48AA 3 port serial breakout cable for system controller card
NTAK19FB 4 port serial breakout cable for NTAK02 card
when buying secondhand gear, you really have to remember that the meridian line has been around forever, and that a lot of stuff from older or larger models is not cross compatible with the smaller systems. any part numbers starting with QPC are from older and larger switches and will not work in the option 11. CP series call processors with the impressive CPU specs are for larger switches and will not work in the option 11 context. they boot from hard disks that we do not have, loaded with software that we probably cannot get. the option 11 systems, in contrast, load their operating system from a ROM cartridge and save data on flash memory. you will do just fine if you stick to the boards in the table above. stray from that and i make no promises about it working.
another important thing to keep in mind when buying secondhand option 11 gear is that the system controllers have critical ancillary parts that must be included for it to work. option 11 and option 11e system controllers must have a software cartridge fitted to run. they will not work without the software cartridge. option 11c system controllers must have a RAM SIMM, a software daughterboard, and a software security dongle mounted. if the controller is missing any of these items, it will not work. having a photo of the system controller up front before buying is critical to make sure everything you need is still there. i would not recommend buying system controllers unseen unless the seller confirms that everything is there.
so in sum, if you want to set up your own option 11 system, all you need to get is at least one complete NTAK11 chassis or equivalent with power supply and all backplanes installed. add a system controller card, at least one line card, and at least one trunk card, and you will be all set. in the case of the straight NTAK01 option 11 processor, there is no tone and digit switch capability integrated into the processor card so you must have an NTAK03 card installed to provide these services. the NTBK45 option 11e processor and the NTDK20 option 11c processor both have integrated tone and digit switch, so there is no need to install an NTAK03 card unless you need extra capacity. all three of the processor cards include three serial ports for the system console and any auxiliary functions that may be required such as a CDR log or maintenance dial up modem.
looking at the system controller, you should see one button marked MAN INT and a block of DIP switches. the button is basically an interrupt switch, and the switch block sets the console baud rate. i leave it set at 9600. as far as the rest of the communication parameters go, the nortel defaults to 8N1. if you have a NTDK20 processor you will also see a a few PCMCIA slots; these are used in the initial installation of the PBX, and can also be used to provide a secondary backup media for the PBX configuration database. to connect the console terminal, look to the connector panel under the card cage. you should see two 9 pin D shell connectors, sort of lined up vertically under the system controller card slot. connect your console cable to the uppermost 9 pin port, closest to the card cage. you might need to use a null modem adapter to make it work. pretty much any terminal emulation will work; the administration interface is not screen oriented.
i should probably mention the console serial cable itself since it is a little special. as i mention above, the system controller card actually has three serial ports built into it. all three of them come out on the uppermost 9 pin port under the system controller. if you hook up a regular serial cable, you will just get the console on port 0. this is of course vital and easy enough to get to with a plain old serial cable, but if you want to get to the other two serial ports, say to use as maintenance TTYs or a CDR log, you need a special cable with part number NTBK48AA. this tends unfortunately to be a rather expensive cable. you can find some pinouts for this cable on the internet but they dont seem to really work. i finally just gave up and purchased one though i havent bothered to pin it out and check it against what the pinout is purported to be.
also, while discussing the connector panel, i do want to mention explicitly that each connector on the connector panel corresponds to the card in the slot immediately above it in the card cage. you can use the technical reference manual or various card specific datasheets to determine the pinouts of the RJ21 centronics style connectors when various cards are plugged into the slots above them. for the system controller they make it nice and easy for us by providing the serial ports already pinned to a D shell, but other cards need to be broken out to punchdown blocks.

cabling the meridian

cabling up cards in the meridian to a 66 block can be a little confusing to the first timer so i want to touch briefly on it here. basically for each card, you connect the cable via 50 pin centronics to the port under its slot in the meridian. on the other end of the cable is just wires, which you will punch down on a 66 block according to the RJ21 color code standard, described in the table below. you could use a 110 block instead but i prefer the 66 block so that will be my focus here.
wire colornortel pin66 block pin
white+blue stripe261
white+orange stripe273
white+green stripe285
white+brown stripe297
white+gray stripe309
red+blue stripe3111
red+orange stripe3213
red+green stripe3315
red+brown stripe3417
red+gray stripe3519
black+blue stripe3621
black+orange stripe3723
black+green stripe3825
black+brown stripe3927
black+gray stripe4029
yellow+blue stripe4131
yellow+orange stripe4233
yellow+green stripe4335
yellow+brown stripe4437
yellow+gray stripe4539
violet+blue stripe4641
violet+orange stripe4743
violet+green stripe4845
violet+brown stripe4947
violet+gray stripe5049
blue+white stripe12
orange+white stripe24
green+white stripe36
brown+white stripe48
gray+white stripe510
blue+red stripe612
orange+red stripe714
green+red stripe816
brown+red stripe918
gray+red stripe1020
blue+black stripe1122
orange+black stripe1224
green+black stripe1326
brown+black stripe1428
gray+black stripe1530
blue+yellow stripe1632
orange+yellow stripe1734
green+yellow stripe1836
brown+yellow stripe1938
gray+yellow stripe2040
blue+violet stripe2142
orange+violet stripe2244
green+violet stripe2346
brown+violet stripe2448
gray+violet stripe2550
looking at the 66 block mounted vertically, number the block starting at the top with the uppermost row as 1, going down, with the bottom most row being numbered 50. punch down the requisite color of wire at the requisite 66 block position. the nortel pin numbers reference the pin number of the centronics connector that is plugged in to the meridian. it is important to note that when we read a nortel manual that discusses the pinout of a card, it will give us a pin number that we call the nortel pin number in the above table. when we want to actually cable something up, we need to translate from the nortel pin number to the 66 block number using the table. the 66 block number identifies the pins that we actually need to cable from the block to the jack or RJ48/RJ45/RJ11 connector end. dont make the mistake of taking the pin numbers nortel gives you to be pins on the 66 block itself or else all your cabling will be off.
there is actually a method to the madness here and it is that, for the simplest cases of an analog or digital line card, you have the case where nortel pins 1 and 26 are tip and ring of line 1, nortel pins 2 and 27 are tip and ring of line 2, nortel pins 3 and 28 are tip and ring of line 3, and so forth. the cabling scheme on the 66 block means that nortel pins 1 and 26 become 66 block pins 1 and 2, nortel pins 2 and 27 become 66 block pins 3 and 4, and so on. thus, each line ends up on adjacent pins on the 66 block.

powering up the system

once everything is cabled up, plug in the switch and hit the nice big circuit breaker style power switch. if all goes well, you should see something like the following, at least on an option 11 or option 11e switch. the option 11c switch has an underlying vxworks layer that previous switches do not, and it adds its own startup messages to the output.
HWR000


SYS000 0400 0003 0800 00 
SYS0089  12 0
SYS0089  12 1
SYS0089  13 0
SYS0089  13 1
DATA FROM CARTR.
  SYST. CORE  EDD
  CARTR.    EDD
SYSLOAD RELEASE 21.35
DONE
INI000 0000 00 00 00 0000 0000 0003 0800 0000 
EHM300  01 
DSET000 DOWN LOAD 37 0 6 0 0 0 0 608 
INI006 0082 008A 

>
XMI002 1  XMFR
XMI002 2  DTI/PRI 
XMI002 3  XEM 
XMI002 4  DTI/PRI 
XMI002 5  XDLC
XMI002 7  XDLC
XMI002 9  
DTA003 2 
PRI000 2 5 
DTA003 4 
PRI000 4 5 
DTA005 2 
DTA005 4 
DTA007 2 
DTA007 4 
DCH2023 10 3 
MSDL300 10 FROM: SYS DSBL - SELFTESTS PASSED  TO: ENBL
           TIME: 00:00:32 

DCH: 10  EST CONFIRM  TIME:  0:00:40  1/04/1993  

DCH: 10  EST REMOTE   TIME:  0:00:42  1/04/1993  

XMI002 6  XMLC
XMI002 8  XALC
DCH: 10  RLS CONFIRM  TIME:  0:00:56  1/04/1993  

DCH: 10  EST REMOTE   TIME:  0:00:56  1/04/1993  

DCH2034 10 1 
DCH: 10  EST CONFIRM  TIME:  0:00:56  1/04/1993  

DROL000 CED   LD35  BEGIN  00:01   1/4/1993 

DROL001 CED   LD35  END  00:04   1/4/1993 

DROL000 DTIM  LD60  BEGIN  00:04   1/4/1993 

PRI TRK  LOOP 2 ATLP 0
SLFT OK
TRSH CNT:
BPV     -000 
SLIPD   -000 
SLIPR   -019 
CRC     -000 
LOSFA   -001 
OS_BPV  -000 
OS_LOSFA-000 
OS_YEL  -001 
 
PRI TRK  LOOP 4 ATLP 0
SLFT OK
TRSH CNT:
BPV     -000 
SLIPD   -000 
SLIPR   -019 
CRC     -000 
LOSFA   -001 
OS_BPV  -000 
OS_LOSFA-000 
OS_YEL  -001 
 
DROL001 DTIM  LD60  END  00:05   1/4/1993 

OVL111 044 BKGD 

TTY 00 SCH MTC BUG    0:06
we can split up the startup messages into a few distinct categories. the first category is just nonsensical spew from the boot loader. that would roughly be everything above the angle bracket. following that we have the system bus probe. we can read this and see what cards the switch is detecting, which gives a little reassurance that a given card is at least nominally working. from looking at the output, you can see that i have a multifrequency receiver in slot 1, dti/pri cards in slots 2 and 4, an e&m trunk card in slot 4, digital line cards in slots 5 and 7, and analog line cards in slots 6 and 8. note that there are some cards such as the NTAK02 and NTAK03 that will not show up in the bus probe. you just have to know that they are there. for example, i have a NTAK02 card in slot 10, but you couldnt tell just from looking at the bus probe.
nonetheless, it is good to take note of the XMI002 messages for two reasons. one, they give at least nominal assurance that the card is working and two, you need to know the slot numbers for programming the switch so anything that gives you information about what card is in which slot is certainly helpful in this regard.
after the bus probe, the switch runs a startup script (DROL) and performs other initialization tasks such as bringing up the d channels for pri trunks. wait a while and let the startup script complete. hit RETURN on the console and you should be presented with the system banner.
OVL111 000 IDLE 

TTY 00 SCH MTC BUG    0:10
the OVL111 000 IDLE lets us know that the switch is currently idle and ready for us to log in. if we see anything but IDLE, the switch is still in the middle of running the startup routine, and we must wait before logging in. you should only log in when the switch is IDLE.

documentation

before we really try to log in to the switch, i want to touch on the important issue of documentation. you really need to have some documentation to get anywhere with the meridian. the commands used to program the switch are not at all obvious, and error messages returned by the system are just cryptic alphanumeric codes with no descriptive text. thus, having the administration command reference and a cross reference for the error messages is a must. it used to be difficult to obtain documentation for the meridian but since i first started learning about the platform, the documentation has become quite easy to find with a web search. the table below contains the title and publication numbers for the manuals which are absolutely critical to have when working with the meridian.
meridian 1 option 11c technical reference guide (553-3011-100)
meridian 1 software input/output guide, administration (553-3001-311)
meridian 1 software input/output guide, maintenance (553-3001-511)
meridian 1 software input/output guide, system messages (553-3001-411)
the technical reference guide will give you the general clue as far as the hardware of the meridian goes. it should provide you with a feel for how the system was designed and how all the various component parts work together. practically, it furnishes specifications, jumper settings, and pinouts for all of the various expansion cards that compose a meridian PBX. when discussing system controllers it mostly focuses on the newer NTDK20 option 11c card but all of the information regarding expansion cards is still completely relevant if you are running an older processor.
the administration guide is the main command reference for the meridian system. this guide is critical to working with the switch. the companion text to this is the equally critical system messages guide. this is just a giant index of all the possible cryptic alphanumeric error codes along with descriptions of what the error actually is in plain english so you can actually troubleshoot the problem. the maintenance guide is also very important to have it you are doing anything outside of simple moves, adds, or changes on the switch. it is basically an addendum to the administration guide that describes maintenance and diagnostic commands. you really need at least these four manuals to get anywhere with the meridian.

logging in

read the documentation over a little bit before you log in to the switch just to get a feel for the system. when it starts to make sense, go back to your console and hit RETURN again. you should see the system banner again. type the command LOGI and hit RETURN.
OVL111 000 IDLE 

TTY 00 SCH MTC BUG    0:10
LOGI
PASS?
to be safe, be sure to type it in all caps. older revisions of the software prior to release 22 will not respond to lower case input and instead throw an error message. the system will prompt you for a password, which motivates the following discussion of the authentication model at work on the meridian.
in the most simple case, the meridian switch has two levels of privilege. that is to say, you can consider the meridian as having two accounts. each account is distinguished by a different password. the two accounts are similar in the sense that they can both change almost all aspects of the switch configuration. the only difference is that one account can be used to set system passwords and view various tables pertaining to passwords and auth codes, while the other cannot. i may refer to the lesser privileged level of access as PWD1, and the more privileged as PWD2.
you can use either password to log in to the switch. if you do something that requires the PWD2 level of access, you will be prompted for the PWD2 password, regardless of whether you used PWD1 or PWD2 to log into the system initially. you really need to know PWD2 or else you will not be able to really take full control of the switch. ideally you got one or both of them from the vendor of your system controller card, but oftentimes we are not so lucky.
for a little background on passwords, consider the meridian system security guide. it states that as of release 25, passwords on the meridian can be from 4 to 16 characters in length. the password can include numeric as well as uppercase and lowercase alphabetic characters. the switch also has the option to enable the use of usernames for accounts, instead of just using a password for access. when this option is enabled, the system automatically creates two users with names ADMIN1 and ADMIN2 that take the PWD1 and PWD2 passwords, respectively. additional user accounts can be created with access to a limited set of overlay programs (LAPW). the usernames themselves can be up to 11 mixed case alphanumeric characters. note that even on older releases where command input must be furnished only in uppercase, the system is still sensitive to mixed case in usernames and passwords.
in addition to all this, the meridian can be configured to just flat out reject all login attempts after a certain number of failed login attempts regardless of whether the password is correct or not until a certain amount of time passes. all of these security measures taken together mean that if you buy some used equipment and the previous admin was paranoid, brute forcing the switch could potentially be somewhat tricky, even given some kind of automated solution such as an expect script. on the other hand, the default PWD2 is more common than you might think, so it is not altogether hopeless.
the real problem here and the reason that i spend so much time here discussing passwords and usernames is that there is not really an easy way to just clear out the existing configuration on the switch like there is on say a cisco router, even given physical access to the switch and console. ultimately the moral of the story here is that unless you have a friend who is a nortel certified tech, you either need to be able to guess the PWD2 password, buy system controllers on a trial and error basis until you find one with the default PWD2 of 0000, or have an existing configuration database where the passwords are known that you can restore on a locked out controller. i have maybe six or eight controller cards across all option 11 types and at least two of them were defaulted when i got them. so the odds are not terrible. sometimes folks just left the default password set, or you find new old stock spares with defaults.
note that since the initial writing of this document, further information has hit the web regarding meridian password recovery. if you can get access to the configuration database (say, via PDT), a tool is available at mike's pbx cookbook to fish the passwords out (thanks mike! any chance we can see the algorithm?)
so let me repeat that a common default password to try on the switch is 0000
when you have the password, type it at the PASS prompt and hit RETURN. upon a successful login you will get a message that you have LOGGED IN before landing at the overlay loader prompt. newer revisions of the system support the printing of an intimidating message after logging in which i think is fun to leave enabled.
TTY 00 SCH MTC BUG    1:17
logi
PASS?

 WARNING: THE PROGRAMS AND DATA STORED ON THIS SYSTEM ARE LICENSED TO
 OR ARE THE PROPERTY OF NT/BNR AND ARE LAWFULLY AVAILABLE ONLY TO 
 AUTHORIZED USERS FOR APPROVED PURPOSES. UNAUTHORIZED ACCESS TO ANY
 PROGRAM OR DATA ON SYSTEM IS NOT PERMITTED. THIS SYSTEM MAY BE
 MONITORED AT ANY TIME FOR OPERATIONAL REASONS. THEREFORE, IF YOU
 ARE NOT AN AUTHORIZED USER, DO NOT ATTEMPT TO LOGIN. 

.
TTY #00 LOGGED IN 01:18  31/5/2009 

>

using the overlay loader

now that you have successfully logged in to the switch, i should probably tell you how to get around a little bit. basically, when you first log in, you end up landing in something called the overlay loader. think of the overlay loader as a shell that only has one command, which allows you to load an overlay. an overlay is basically a program that allows you to administer one aspect of the system. there are a number of different overlays, each of which handles a particular configuration or diagnostic task. you might also hear the overlays referred to as loads. each load is identified by an integer, X, and the command to invoke the load would be LD X. for example, we invoke a print routine, load 22, below.
>LD 22
PT2000 

REQ  
the loads are named as such because historically, when you accessed one from the overlay loader, it would literally load the program from the floppy or tape drive on the switch and it was very, very slow. these days it all comes out of flash or ROM so we dont have to wait around much. but its funny to read old documentation which implies that a load could take thirty seconds or a minute to actually come up after being invoked.
when you invoke a load, it usually prints some sort of banner and prompts you for your REQuest. the responses available to you are given in the system administration guide for each particular load. in general, some common responses are NEW, CHG, OUT, and PRT. sometimes a lot of functionality is crammed into one load that will allow you to define NEW configuration, CHanGe an existing configuration, take something OUT of current configuration, or PRinT the current configuration. other times, a load is very simple and will only PRinT configuration, like LD 22.
while navigating loads, you will always want to remember that entering four asterisks **** in response to any prompt will take you back to the overlay loader and cancel the current change in progress. also remember that if you make a mistake in response to a prompt, you can type a single asterisk * and hit RETURN. you will then be prompted to enter the value again.

the general procedure here is that you log in, enter an overlay from the overlay loader, do something, return to the overlay loader, enter another overlay, and so on, until you are all done, at which point you will want to save your changes then log out.

cards and units

another thing that is critical to be familiar with when working with the meridian is how the system addresses option cards. basically, everything in the system has an address, which is called a TN, or terminal number. when configuring the switch, you will often be prompted for a TN. the documentation from nortel is a little sparse on what a TN actually is so i will tell you quite explicitly. if you look in the administration guide, it will tell you something about the valid response to a TN prompt being of the format L S C U, or loop, slot, card, unit.
really you should ignore this. you only specify TNs in this format on the larger meridian systems. usually right under this stuff about L S C U in the documentation, you will see a note that for small systems, the format is C U or card, unit. by small systems, they mean the option 11 line. this is fortunate because it makes life a lot easier for us. you determine the TN thus by noting the slot number in which the card is inserted, which will be the card number, as well as the unit number. the unit number starts at zero and what it represents varies from card to card. a unit is most typically a line. for a station card or trunk card, the first line is unit 0, the second line is unit 1, and so forth. a unit might be a serial port or a tone generator. some cards might only have a single unit. if you are unsure of the card number, refer to the bus probe messages generated by the system at boot time, or look at the legend under the card cage.

logging out

in the most simple single user sense, the overlay loader has not just one but really two commands, one to load overlays and the other to log you out. when you are finished with your configuration changes, use the LOGO command at the overlay loader prompt to end your session.
OVL000 
>LOGO
>
OVL111 044 BKGD 

TTY 00 SCH MTC BUG    1:26

reclaiming gray market option 11c processors

as i mention earlier on this page, it is not entirely clear how one might just flat out reset or recover the PWD1 and PWD2 passwords on a processor card without already knowing them (outside of using PDT), and there is no way to just clear out the configuration and return the system back to a factory default state without a software installation card and a bunch of keycodes. however, so long as you or a friend has access to a meridian where the PWD1 and PWD2 passwords are known, you can make a copy of that configuration database to a host computer and then load it on to any arbitrary system controller you may later acquire. thus, there is no need to recover or reset to default any existing passwords, when you can just replace them with your own. no password controlled access of any sort is required to the recipient processor card in order to perform this procedure so long as you can get to the system console TTY 0.
basically, all you need is a recipient option 11c system controller card and a donor CCBR file from a meridian that you already have PWD2 access on, obtained with the XBK command from LD 43 or LD 143 on the donor PBX. the recipient system controller card must have a security dongle installed and a fully functional software load, with the only issue being that you do not have the passwords to log in. this is usually the case for most system controllers that you will find and it is mostly just a case of being careful to avoid the odd one where the security dongle is missing or the software daughterboard has been wiped.
we are taking advantage of the fact that there is an excellent pre boot utility menu available on the option 11c processor that allows the restoration of any configuration database to the controller without needing to log in to the controller first with any existing passwords that it may have. we are also greatly facilitated by the fact that the CCBR database backup files are not specific to the system on which they were initially generated, and the ISM software licensing parameters follow the software daughterboard, not the configuration database, so there are no worries about database compatibility, or not being able to take advantage of the full feature sets available on the various processor cards which you may acquire.
step 1: get a donor CCBR database backup file from a meridian system where you already have full PWD2 access. if you are preparing this yourself rather than getting it from a friend, basically what you do is just go to either LD 43 or LD 143 depending on release on the donor PBX and use the XBK command to back up your database to a host computer using xmodem. after invoking the XBK command, you will be prompted to enter a description for the backup. when done entering the description, hit RETURN twice. you should then receive a prompt R> at which point you will want to set up your host computer to receive data via xmodem crc protocol. hyperterminal will work fine for this. you should end up with a CCBR file on your computer when the transfer is complete.
step 2: install your recipient option 11c system controler card and power it up. hit ctrl-I when prompted to enter the install and upgrade menu, even though we arent really going to install or upgrade the system software. when you get to the menu, select 3 to go to Utilities. at the next menu, select 1 to go to Restore Backed Up Database. finally, select 4 to select Option 11/11e CCBR file. just say "y" when reminded that you will actually need to have a CCBR file on hand to proceed. at this point, the system should say Ready to receive... at which point you will want to initiate the xmodem transfer of the backup database file from the host computer. again, hyperterminal seems to work fine for this.
step 3: when the transfer is complete, you will see some transfer statistics and hopefully a message similar to the following
REMOTE BACKUP file found..

Files successfully transferred into source directory.
Database restore and upgrade complete
when you return to the menu, type "q" to exit and say "y" when prompted. the system will the continue the boot procedure. what we have basically just done here is to copy our existing configuration database with known passwords to the recipient system controller card, overwriting any previous configuration database and of course passwords that it may have initially had.
step 4: the first time that the system boots after restoring the CCBR backup file, you may see a DATA CONVERSION occur if the donor and recipient versions differ. this is a normal and desired thing to have happen. when the system finishes booting, you should be able to log in with the passwords that you had used in the configuration stored in the CCBR backup file.
step 5: after logging in successfully, you should pop in to LD 43 and do an EDD. this will ensure our new configuration gets saved to the flash on the system controller. when you attempt to perform an EDD, you may end up with failures such as EDD016 NO GO BAD DATA. if this occurs, you can try to use the EDD CLR command instead of EDD; this will override the write inhibit flag on the configuration database and force an EDD. if this occurs, there is no need for despair as it rarely tanks the whole thing. rather, you may just see sporadic data corruption in various aspects of your configuration. you just need to look around and test everything out after bringing the switch up with the newly restored configuration. when you find something that doesnt work, just OUT and recreate it and it will work fine again. this corruption seems to occur mostly when you make major version jumps e.g. release 21 to release 24. if you try to keep the major version close between both the donor and recipient e.g release 21 to release 22 this is very unlikely to occur.
thats all there is to unlocking basically any locked out option 11c system controller so long as the existing configuration database doesnt matter and you have a donor database available. please do note however that this procedure is only applicable to option 11c processors as the recipient since they are unique in offering the ctrl-I preboot utility menu.

pdt

you may occasionally see mention in internet forums or mailing lists of a sort of debugger or rom monitor called PDT. you can access this by hitting ctrl-PDT on an option 11c processor at pretty much any time while it is running. you dont have to do anything special with the front panel dip switches. just hit the control key sequence. upon successful use of the key sequence, you will be prompted to log in to PDT. as with the regular administrative layer of the PBX, there is both a level 1 and a level 2 password to access PDT. the default level 1 PDT password seems to be "thorsgr8" and the default level 2 PDT password has been reported to be "2tdp22ler" (thanks mike!). you can look around in there; it is basically a vxworks shell. i think it might be possible to use PDT to fish out the passwords from an existing configuration database, or to reset the passwords when they are not known but i do not know how this is done and whether or not it requires level 2 PDT access. as far as i can tell, PDT is not available on the option 11 or option 11e processor modules since they seem to run the meridian operating system on a standalone basis, rather than as a task under vxworks.

hidden debug menu on option 11c system controllers

it is possible to access an undocumented debug mode on the option 11c system controller. looking at the front panel of the processor, set the 150 baud dip switch to on, in addition to the dip switch that you have already set for the baud rate of the console. two dip switches will be set in total. then power on the system. when prompted to hit ctrl-I to enter the preboot utility menu, instead hit ctrl-B. this will take you to a hardware debug menu. you can read and write random values to memory here, and run a fairly comprehensive self test on the system controller itself. it is also possible to use this debug mode to erase the software daughterboard, although i would not recommend doing this unless you have a software PCMCIA card and keycodes available for the reinstallation.

clearing out old switch configuration

when we acquire a new meridian option 11 switch, we will generally have to initialize the system so as to get rid of the old configuration and replace it with our own. unfortunately, as i mention earlier, there is no way to just clear out the configuration in one fell swoop like there is on something like a cisco router. if you dont already have your own configuration database handy and ready to load, basically what you will need to do is go manually into each load and clean things out using REQ OUT. once you have cleaned out the old switch configuration, you can start to add your own. to do this, i basically work from LD 10 down and and OUT everything that i can. you will want to be sure to check out at least the following loads.
  • ld 10 and ld 11 - ananlog and digital phone sets
  • ld 12 - operator console phone sets
  • ld 14 - trunks
  • ld 16 - routes
  • ld 17 - ttys, d channels,common equipment
  • ld 23 - automatic call distribution
  • ld 49 - nfcr and fcr
  • ld 50 - call park
  • ld 57 - ffc
  • ld 60 - digital trunk interfaces
  • ld 73 - digital data block
  • ld 86, ld 87, and ld 90 - automatic routing
  • ld 88 - auth codes
  • ld 96 - pri d channels
ideally we want to OUT everything such that we can delete CDB 0 which is the default CDB, along with any other CDB records that may exist on the system. then we just recreate CDB 0 as default which is as close to a fresh configuration as we will ever get. start adding your own configuration from there.
LD 15
REQ OUT
TYPE CDB
CUST 0

LD 15
REQ NEW
TYPE DEFAULT
CUST 0
ANI_DATA
ANAT 0000
ANLD 000
i am not sure exactly ANAT and ANLD do but you seem to be forced to specify one. it set it as above and i have never had any problems with anything.
every time you attempt to out CDB 0, it will either just do it, or give you an error which basically tells you what you still need to clear out in order to delete CDB 0. just keep clearing stuff out and trying to OUT CDB 0 until successful. the error messages reference guide is a must for this task.
do note that there is a particular workflow to the process of removing the configuration for digital trunks.
  • 1. disable clock controller (LD 60)
  • 2. out the trunk data blocks for the card (LD 14)
  • 3. out the route data block for the card (LD 16)
  • 4. shut down the dchi submodule on the card (LD 96)
  • 5. shut down the dti/pri cards themselves (LD 60)
  • 6. out the ADAN for the d-channel (LD 17)
  • 7. out the clock controller (LD 73)
  • 8. remove digital loops (LD 17)
  • 9. remove the digital data block (LD 73)

clearing out SPWD - the secure data password

when you try to OUT the ESN or auth code data, you may be prompted for SPWD - the secure data password. we can reset the SPWD to something that we know as long as we know the PWD2 password. in this example we will reset the SPWD to 0000.
LD 15
REQ CHG
TYPE PWD_DATA
CUST 0
SPWD 0000
PWD2 (whatever it is)
ATAC 0000
PWD2 (again)

saving the switch configuration

we will usually want to explicitly save our configuration after making changes. the meridian does by default run a configuration dump as a part of the periodic background routine, but i always like to save my configuration explicitly as well. just use the EDD command from within LD 43.
>LD 43
EDD000 
.EDD

EDD TO SYST. CORE
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

DIRECTORY
CONFIG 
PATCH  01 
PHYSICAL MAP 
BCS TEMPLATE 
PBX TEMPLATE 
CUST 
ACUST
ROUTE
LTN TN 
LTN LNK
TN 
SCL
DIGITAL
DTI
ASNCH
TRSH 
BG-TIME
BG-CAT 
PRI
ARIES  
SYSP 
XPEC 
XTDT 
FTC
MCAD   
FCAD   
FDCT   
LAPW
SEER
TIME   
CHECKING

RECORD COUNT =  0023 

EDD TO CARTR.
%%%%%%%%

DATABASE BACKUP COMPLETE

.
EDD000 
.**
.
EDD000 
.**
>
be sure that power to the switch is not disturbed while the configuration is being saved. also note that you can back up your configuration to a computer using the XBK command from within either LD 43 on older option 11 and option 11e controllers, or LD 143 on the newer option 11c controllers. the XBK command copies the configuration database on the switch to the host computer using the xmodem crc protocol.

set the date and time

the system time is set with the STAD command in LD 2. the format is DD MM YYYY HH MM SS.
>LD 2
TFC000 
.STAD  19 10 2008 23 54 00
.****
.
>

configure a T100 test line

the meridian supports a combination milliwatt and silent termination test line. it is not enabled by default and must be configured in the customer data block LD 15. the example below shows a T100 line configured at DN 5000. note that this cannot be dialled locally from a phone on the meridian; it will just get reorder. the call has to come in on a trunk in order for it to go through.
>LD 15
CDB000 
UDATA: 156335 0  PDATA: 229373 2 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ: CHG
TYPE: TST_DATA
CUST 0
T100 5000
REF0 
TST0 
REF1 
TST1 
REF2 
TST2 
REF3 
TST3 

UDATA: 156335 0  PDATA: 229347 2 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ: ****

>

print currently configured analog sets

to generate this report, go to LD 20 and issue a PRT request, with TYPE specified as 500. the example below shows a switch with four analog sets configured on DNs 8000 to 8003.
>LD 20

PT0000 
REQ: PRT
TYPE: 500
TN   
CDEN 
CUST 
TEN  
DATE 
PAGE 
DES  

DES  MACHRM
TN   006 0 00 00 
TYPE 500 
CDEN 4D
CUST 0 
WRLS NO
DN   8000    MARP
AST  NO  
IAPG 0 
HUNT 
TGAR 0 
LDN  NO
NCOS 0 
SGRP 0 
RNPG 0 
XLST 
SCI  0 
CLS  UNR DTN FBD XFD WTA THFD FND HTD ONS 
     LPR XRD CWD SWD MWD LPD XHD CCSD LND TVD 
     CFTD SFD MRD C6D PDN CNID CLBD AUTU
     ICDD CDMD LLCN EHTD MCTD 
     GPUD DPUD CFXD ARHD OVDD AGTD CLTD LDTD ASCD 
     MBXD CPFA CPTA DDGA NAMA 
     MCRD SHL ABDD CFHD 
     CWND USMD USRD BNRD 
PLEV 02 
MLWU_LANG 0 
DATE  1 APR 1993 

DES  LVNGRM
TN   006 0 00 01 
TYPE 500 
CDEN 4D
CUST 0 
WRLS NO
DN   8001    MARP
AST  NO  
IAPG 0 
HUNT 
TGAR 0 
LDN  NO
NCOS 0 
SGRP 0 
RNPG 0 
XLST 
SCI  0 
CLS  UNR DTN FBD XFD WTA THFD FND HTD ONS 
     LPR XRD CWD SWD MWD LPD XHD CCSD LND TVD 
     CFTD SFD MRD C6D PDN CNID CLBD AUTU
     ICDD CDMD LLCN EHTD MCTD 
     GPUD DPUD CFXD ARHD OVDD AGTD CLTD LDTD ASCD 
     MBXD CPFA CPTA DDGA NAMA 
     MCRD SHL ABDD CFHD 
     CWND USMD USRD BNRD 
PLEV 02 
MLWU_LANG 0 
DATE  1 APR 1993 

DES  ANLG02
TN   006 0 00 02 
TYPE 500 
CDEN 4D
CUST 0 
WRLS NO
DN   8002    MARP
AST  NO  
IAPG 0 
HUNT 
TGAR 0 
LDN  NO
NCOS 0 
SGRP 0 
RNPG 0 
XLST 
SCI  0 
CLS  UNR DTN FBD XFD WTA THFD FND HTD ONS 
     LPR XRD CWD SWD MWD LPD XHD CCSD LND TVD 
     CFTD SFD MRD C6D PDN CNID CLBD AUTU
     ICDD CDMD LLCN EHTD MCTD 
     GPUD DPUD CFXD ARHD OVDD AGTD CLTD LDTD ASCD 
     MBXD CPFA CPTA DDGA NAMA 
     MCRD SHL ABDD CFHD 
     CWND USMD USRD BNRD 
PLEV 02 
MLWU_LANG 0 
DATE  1 APR 1993 

DES  ANLG03
TN   006 0 00 03 
TYPE 500 
CDEN 4D
CUST 0 
WRLS NO
DN   8003    MARP
AST  NO  
IAPG 0 
HUNT 
TGAR 0 
LDN  NO
NCOS 0 
SGRP 0 
RNPG 0 
XLST 
SCI  0 
CLS  UNR DTN FBD XFD WTA THFD FND HTD ONS 
     LPR XRD CWD SWD MWD LPD XHD CCSD LND TVD 
     CFTD SFD MRD C6D PDN CNID CLBD AUTU
     ICDD CDMD LLCN EHTD MCTD 
     GPUD DPUD CFXD ARHD OVDD AGTD CLTD LDTD ASCD 
     MBXD CPFA CPTA DDGA NAMA 
     MCRD SHL ABDD CFHD 
     CWND USMD USRD BNRD 
PLEV 02 
MLWU_LANG 0 
DATE  1 APR 1993 


NACT 
REQ: ****
>
OVL000 
>

print currently configured model 2008 digital sets

to generate this report, return to LD 20 and issue a PRT request, but this time the TYPE will be 2008. the example below shows a switch with four digital sets configured on DNs 7000 to 7003. note how a phone number is assigned to a key on a digital set. since the digital sets have many keys, we cannot just assign a single phone number to a set itself. instead, we can assign a phone number to each key on the digital set. also note that there are many different types of digital set; you only get the specific TYPE that you specify.
>LD 20

PT0000 
REQ: PRT
TYPE: 2008
TN   
CUST 
TEN  
DATE 
PAGE 
DES  

DES  LVNGRM
TN   005 0 00 00 
TYPE 2008
CDEN 8D
CUST 0 
FDN  
TGAR 0 
LDN  NO
NCOS 0 
SGRP 0 
RNPG 0 
SCI  0 
SSU  
LNRS 16 
XLST 
CLS  UNR FBD WTA LPR MTD FND HTD ADD 
     MWD AAD IMD XHD IRD NID OLD VCE DRG3
     POD DSX VMD CMSD CCSD SWD LNA CNDD
     CFTD SFD MRD PDN DDV CNID 
     ICDD CDMD LLCN MCTD CLBD AUTU
     GPUD DPUD DNDD CFXD ARHD CLTD ASCD 
     CPFA CPTA ABDD CFHD FICD NAID 
     DDGA NAMA 
     USMD USRD ULAD 
CPND_LANG ENG
HUNT 
PLEV 02 
AST  
IAPG 0 
ITNA NO  
DGRP 
MLWU_LANG 0 
DNDR 0 
KEY  00 SCR 7000    MARP
     01 AO6 
     02 LNK 16 
     03 MSB 
     04 PRK 
     05 TRN 
     06     
     07     
DATE  4 APR 1993 

DES  DGTL01
TN   005 0 00 01 
TYPE 2008
CDEN 8D
CUST 0 
FDN  
TGAR 0 
LDN  NO
NCOS 0 
SGRP 0 
RNPG 0 
SCI  0 
SSU  
XLST 
CLS  UNR FBD WTA LPR MTD FND HTD ADD 
     MWD AAD IMD XHD IRD NID OLD VCE DRG1
     POD DSX VMD CMSD CCSD SWD LND CNDD
     CFTD SFD MRD PDN DDV CNID 
     ICDD CDMD LLCN MCTD CLBD AUTU
     GPUD DPUD DNDD CFXD ARHD CLTD ASCD 
     CPFA CPTA ABDD CFHD FICD NAID 
     DDGA NAMA 
     USMD USRD ULAD 
CPND_LANG ENG
HUNT 
PLEV 02 
AST  
IAPG 0 
ITNA NO  
DGRP 
MLWU_LANG 0 
DNDR 0 
KEY  00 SCR 7001    MARP
     01     
     02     
     03     
     04     
     05     
     06     
     07     
DATE  1 APR 1993 

DES  DGTL02
TN   005 0 00 02 
TYPE 2008
CDEN 8D
CUST 0 
FDN  
TGAR 0 
LDN  NO
NCOS 0 
SGRP 0 
RNPG 0 
SCI  0 
SSU  
XLST 
CLS  UNR FBD WTA LPR MTD FND HTD ADD 
     MWD AAD IMD XHD IRD NID OLD VCE DRG1
     POD DSX VMD CMSD CCSD SWD LND CNDD
     CFTD SFD MRD PDN DDV CNID 
     ICDD CDMD LLCN MCTD CLBD AUTU
     GPUD DPUD DNDD CFXD ARHD CLTD ASCD 
     CPFA CPTA ABDD CFHD FICD NAID 
     DDGA NAMA 
     USMD USRD ULAD 
CPND_LANG ENG
HUNT 
PLEV 02 
AST  
IAPG 0 
ITNA NO  
DGRP 
MLWU_LANG 0 
DNDR 0 
KEY  00 SCR 7002    MARP
     01     
     02     
     03     
     04     
     05     
     06     
     07     
DATE  1 APR 1993 

DES  DGTL03
TN   005 0 00 03 
TYPE 2008
CDEN 8D
CUST 0 
FDN  
TGAR 0 
LDN  NO
NCOS 0 
SGRP 0 
RNPG 0 
SCI  0 
SSU  
XLST 
CLS  UNR FBD WTA LPR MTD FND HTD ADD 
     MWD AAD IMD XHD IRD NID OLD VCE DRG1
     POD DSX VMD CMSD CCSD SWD LND CNDD
     CFTD SFD MRD PDN DDV CNID 
     ICDD CDMD LLCN MCTD CLBD AUTU
     GPUD DPUD DNDD CFXD ARHD CLTD ASCD 
     CPFA CPTA ABDD CFHD FICD NAID 
     DDGA NAMA 
     USMD USRD ULAD 
CPND_LANG ENG
HUNT 
PLEV 02 
AST  
IAPG 0 
ITNA NO  
DGRP 
MLWU_LANG 0 
DNDR 0 
KEY  00 SCR 7003    MARP
     01     
     02     
     03     
     04     
     05     
     06     
     07     
DATE  1 APR 1993 


NACT
REQ: ****
>

add interesting features to digital sets

if you want to enable the call park feature on a digital set, first go to LD 15 and ensure that call park is allowed in the customer record, then go to LD 11 and add it to a key on each digital set where the feature is desired.
LD 15
REQ: CHG
TYPE: FTR_DATA
CUST 0
OPT CPA

LD 11
REQ: CHG
TYPE: 2008
TN   5 0
ECHG YES
ITEM KEY 04 PRK
if you want to enable the last number redial feature on a digital set, again first go to LD 15 and ensure that last number redial is allowed in the customer record, then go to LD 11 and add it to a key on each digital set where the feature is desired.
LD 15
REQ: CHG
TYPE: FTR_DATA
CUST 0
OPT LRA

LD 11
REQ: CHG
TYPE: 2008
TN   5 0
ECHG YES
ITEM CLS LNA
ITEM KEY 02 LNK
to enable call transfer, just assign it to a key on each set where the feature is desired in LD 11. there is nothing to configure in the customer record for this one.
LD 11
REQ: CHG
TYPE: 2008
TN   5 0
ECHG YES
ITEM KEY 05 TRN

print most configured terminal numbers

this is a very helpful report that you can run from LD 20 by issuing a PRT request for TYPE TNB. this prints most configured terminal numbers on the system including digitone receivers, analog sets, digital sets, and trunks. this is most useful when in the process of cleaning up an old configuration as it will tell you a majority of the stuff that you will need to remove. it is also a nice report to run because you can use it to get a list of digital sets of all TYPEs concurrently. i dont furnish an example printout below because it is just too long.
>LD 20

PT0000 
REQ: PRT
TYPE: TNB

print configuration record

you can print out the configuration record for the system common control by issuing a PRT request for TYPE CFN in LD 22. this report includes ADAN parameters for serial devices, CEQU parameters for low level tuning of system settings, and OVLY scripts that run on startup or on a periodic basis. configuration of digital trunks and conference loops also resides in the common equipment settings. note that you can print several parts of this report such as ADAN or CEQU seperately but i just decided to lump them all together here for convenience.
>LD 22
PT2000 

REQ  PRT
TYPE CFN

ADAN   HIST
  SIZE    5000 
  USER MTC BUG 
ADAN     TTY 0 
  CARD 00 
  PORT 0 
  DES  CONSOLE
  USER MTC SCH BUG 
  XSM  NO  
ADAN     TTY 1 
  CARD 00 
  PORT 1 
  DES  LOG
  BPS  9600 
  BITL 8
  STOP 1
  PARY NONE 
  FLOW NO  
  USER SCH CTY 
  XSM  NO  
ADAN     TTY 2 
  CARD 00 
  PORT 2 
  DES  AUX
  BPS  9600 
  BITL 8
  STOP 1
  PARY NONE 
  FLOW NO  
  USER MTC SCH BUG 
  XSM  NO  
ADAN     TTY 3 
  CARD 10 
  PORT 0 
  DES  AUX2
  BPS  9600 
  BITL 8
  STOP 1
  PARY NONE 
  FLOW NO  
  USER MTC SCH BUG 
  XSM  NO  
ADAN     TTY 4 
  CARD 10 
  PORT 2 
  DES  AUX3
  BPS  9600 
  BITL 8
  STOP 1
  PARY NONE 
  FLOW NO  
  USER MTC SCH BUG 
  XSM  NO  
ADAN     DCH 10 
  CTYP MSDL 
  CARD 04 
  PORT 1 
  DES  MC3810DCH
  USR  PRI 
  DCHL 4 



PAGE 001 

  OTBF 32 
  PARM RS422  DTE 
  DRAT 64KC
  CLOK EXT 
  NASA NO  
  IFC  NI2 
  CO_TYPE  STD
  SIDE USR 
  CNEG 1 
  RLS  ID  **
  RCAP 
  MBGA NO
  T310 10 
  T200 3 
  T203 10 
  N200 3 
  N201 260 
  K    7 
PARM 
  LPIB 500 
  HPIB 100 
  500B 100 
  NCR  386 
  MGCR NULL
  NCPU 1
  CFWS NO  
  PCML MU
  ALRM YES 
  ERRM ERR BUG AUD 
  DTRB 100 
  TMRK 128 
  FCDR OLD 
  PCDR NO  
  TPO  YES 
  TSO  YES 
  CLID YES 
  DUR5 NO  
  MLDN YES 
  MARP YES 
  FRPT NEFR
  DCUS 1 
  MSCL 75 
  PMSI 
    MANU PMS1
    PMCR 30 
    PORT NONE
  NDIS 20 
  OCAC YES 
  MTRO MR
  SBA_ADM_INS 001 
  SBA_USER 010 
CEQU 
  MPED 8D
  SUPL  000  004  008  012 
        016  032  036  040 
        048 P080 
  XCT   000 
  CONF  029  030  031 

  DLOP  NUM DCH FRM LCMT YALM TRSH
   PRI  002 24  ESF B8S  FDL  00 



PAGE 002 

        004 23  ESF B8S  FDL  00 
  MISP 
  MTYP 512K 
OVLY 
  SID  0 
  BKGD 044 
  PBXH 01 
  TODR 01 
  DROL 035 060 
ATRN 
  CODE 0   
  SOLR 12  
  ROLR +45.00
  TOLR -45.00
  AGCD NO
  VOLR NO
  HRLR +42.00
  HTLR -44.00
ALARM
  FMT_OUTPUT : OFF
  AF_STATUS  : OFF

  FILTER  ENTRIES SUMMARY
  TRIGGER   SEVERITY  SUPPRESS  ESCALATE

  NO ENTRIES.


  EXCEPTION  ENTRIES SUMMARY
  TRIGGER   

  NO ENTRIES.


REQ  ****
>

print software version

you can print the version and release of the switch software load by performing an ISS request within LD 22. the incremental software management tends to get a lot more granular as the version number increases.
>LD 22
PT2000 

REQ  ISS

VERSION 1411 
RELEASE 21 
ISSUE 35 + 


REQ  

print authentication database

you can print the authentication database of the switch by issuing a PRT request for type PWD from within LD 22. this will tell you what the PWD1 and PWD2 passworsd are. of course, there is a catch: you must know the PWD2 password before the load will run. for the purposes of this example, you can see that both passwords are set to 1234. we can also see where the failed login lockout threshold is set. in this case, the failed login threshold is three failed attempts, after which the TTY will be locked out for an interval of 30 minutes.
>LD 22
PT2000 

REQ  PRT
TYPE PWD
PWD2 

PWD  
  FLTH 3 
  LOCK 30 
  AUDT NO
  INIT NO
  PWD1 1234
  PWD2 1234

REQ  ****
>

configuring call detail recording

step 1: define USER TRF CTY for a particular port in the ADAN record.
ADAN     TTY 1 
  CARD 00 
  PORT 1 
  DES  CDR
  BPS  1200 
  BITL 8
  STOP 1
  PARY NONE 
  FLOW NO  
  USER TRF CTY 
  XSM  NO 
step 2: specify CDR YES for each route for which we want call detail recording.
>LD 16
RDB000 
UDATA: 29817 3  PDATA: 099817 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  CHG
TYPE 
DTC105 RDB
CUST 0
DMOD 
ROUT 20
TKTP 
M911_ANI  
SAT  
RCLS 
DTRK YES 
DGTP DTI 
DSEL 
PTYP 
AUTO 
DNIS 
IANI 
ICOG 
RANX 
SRCH 
TRMB 
STEP 
ACOD 
CPP  
TARG 
BILN 
SGRP 
OABS 
INST 
CNTL 
DRNG 
CDR  YES
INC  YES
LAST YES
QREC YES
OAL  YES
AIA  YES
OAN  NO
OPD  YES
SCH2017 
NATL 
MUS  
MR   
EQAR 
OHQ  
OHQT 
TTBL 
OHTD 
PLEV 
MCTS 
ALRM 

UDATA: 29817 3  PDATA: 099817 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  ****

>
step 3: define cdr data block in the customer record
>LD 15
CDB000 
UDATA: 29817 3  PDATA: 099817 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ: CHG
TYPE: CDR

TYPE CDR_DATA
CUST 0
CDR YES
  AXID NO
  TRCR NO
  CDPR NO
  ECDR NO
  PORT 1		( this corresponds to tty numbers where USER TRF CTY is set )
  PORT 
CHLN 0
FCAF NO

UDATA: 29817 3  PDATA: 099817 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ: ****

>

configuring the option 11c ethernet interface

step 1: go to LD 117 and add a host entry for the meridian itself using the NEW HOST command.
>ld 117
OAM000

=> prt hosts
SCH0099 HOSTS?

=> prt host
 ID  Hostname         IP Address
  1  SECONDARY_ENET   137.135.128.254 
  2  LOCAL_PPP_IF     137.135.192.4   
  3  REMOTE_PPP_IF    100.1.1.1       
  4  N39503           47.1.1.10       
OK

=> NEW HOST PRIMARY_ENET 172.16.1.81
INET Data Added
step 2: add a host entry for the network gateway using the NEW HOST command.
=> NEW HOST GATEWAY_ENET 172.16.1.1
INET Data Added
step 3: assign the host entry that we created for the meridian itself to be the primary IP address for the PBX.
=> CHG ELNK ACTIVE PRIMARY_ENET
INET Database updated
step 4: configure the netmask
=> CHG MASK 255.255.255.0
INET Data Changed
step 5: configure the default route
=> NEW ROUTE 0.0.0.0 172.16.1.1
INET Data Added
step 6: disable and then reenable the ethernet interface in LD 137 to apply the IP address change. after doing this, the meridian should be up on the network and reachable at the assigned address.
>ld 137
CIOD000
.stat elnk

ELNK   ENABLED
Ethernet (qu unit number 0):
Host: N39503
Internet address: 47.1.1.10
Ethernet address: 00:00:75:45:85:99
Netmask: 0xff000000; Subnetmask: 0xffff0000
7784 packets received; 9 packets sent
0 input errors; 0 output errors
0 collisions
.dis elnk

OK
.****
>ld 117
OAM000

=> prt elnk
ACTIVE   ETHERNET: "PRIMARY_ENET" "172.16.1.81"
INACTIVE ETHERNET: "SECONDARY_ENET" "137.135.128.254"
OK

=> ****
>
OVL000 
>ld 137
CIOD000
.enl elnk
Initialize Network Interface.
Network Interface is up.
Host         : PRIMARY_ENET
IP Address   : 172.16.1.81
Sub-netmask  : 255.255.255.0


OK
.****
>
step 7: configure a PTY in LD 17 for remote administration. strangely, you will have to use rlogin. telnet is not supported. it is not required that the DES field say RLOGIN; i just configured that as a reminder.
>ld 17
CFN000 
MEM AVAIL: (U/P): 1316613    USED U P: 131886 26060    TOT: 1474559 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 484 
TMDI D-CHANNELS AVAIL:     2    USED:     0    TOT:     2
DCH  AVAIL:    62    USED:     2    TOT:    64
AML  AVAIL:    16    USED:     0    TOT:    16
REQ  chg
TYPE adan
ADAN new tty 15
TTY_TYPE PTY
PORT 0
DES  RLOGIN
FLOW 
USER SCH MTC BUG
TTYLOG 0
BANR YES

MEM AVAIL: (U/P): 1316522    USED U P: 131938 26099    TOT: 1474559 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 484 
TMDI D-CHANNELS AVAIL:     2    USED:     0    TOT:     2
DCH  AVAIL:    62    USED:     2    TOT:    64
AML  AVAIL:    16    USED:     0    TOT:    16

ADAN DATA SAVED
ADAN 

REQ  ****

>
that is all you will need to do on the meridian to get it up on the network and ready to accept a connection from a remote host. to access the meridian, use rlogin to connect with a username of CPSID1110. this should drop you at the usual X11 login prompt.
wildflower.diablonet.net> rlogin -l CPSID1110 172.16.1.81
Done!


OVL111 000 TTY 00 

TTY 15 SCH MTC BUG   17:16

when you are done, hit ctrl-PDT to jump to PDT. log in with the default password of "thorsgr8" and then type "exit" to disconnect from the meridian.
if you try to rlogin to the meridian without specifying a username, you will land at the PDT login prompt, just as if you had typed ctrl-PDT on any TTY connected to the PBX. you can still access the X11 interface by logging in with the PDT password "thorsgr8" and then using the "sl1input" command.
also note that by default that the meridian only allows one user to be logged in to the system at any given time. when one user logs in to the system, any other user who may have been using it will be logged out. if the system is equipped with the MULTI_USER package, multi user support can be enabled in LD 17 OVLY. you may find it more effective to enable multi user support when using network based remote administration, so you can be logged in both over the network and at a TTY simultaneously.

configuring a NTAK03 tds/dtr card

consider that an NTAK03 tone and digit switch card has been installed in slot 1 of our option 11. we configure it according to the procedure below. first add the TDS card in the common equipment settings using LD 17, then enable the card in LD 34. finally, configure each discrete unit of tone and digit switch on the card with LD 13. there are also a few TTYs available on the NTAK03 card for general use. they are not included below but you can enable them by creating ADAN records in LD 17.
LD 17
REQ CHG
TYPE CEQU
TDS 1

LD 34
ENLX 1

LD 13
REQ NEW
TYPE DTR
TN 001 00
REQ NEW
TYPE DTR
TN 001 01
REQ NEW
TYPE DTR
TN 001 02
REQ NEW
TYPE DTR
TN 001 03
REQ NEW
TYPE DTR
TN 001 04
REQ NEW
TYPE DTR
TN 001 05
REQ NEW
TYPE DTR
TN 001 06
REQ NEW
TYPE DTR
TN 001 07

configuring a NTAK02 sdi/dch card

consider an NTAK02 SDI/DCH card installed in slot 9 of our option 11 with all jumpers set as default. all we must do to enable it is create the requisite ADAN records in LD 17. the example below shows how two of the four ports on the card may be configured.
LD 17
REQ CHG
TYPE ADAN
ADAN NEW TTY 5
CDNO 9
PORT 0
DES SDIDCH_TTY_0
BPS 9600
BITL 8
STOP 1
PARY NONE
ENL
USR MTC SCH BUG

ADAN NEW TTY 6
CDNO 9
PORT 2
DES SDIDCH_TTY_1
BPS 9600
BITL 8
STOP 1
PARY NONE
ENL
USR MTC SCH BUG

configuring a station on NT8D09 analog line card

consider that we have an NT8D09 analog line card in slot 6. LD 10 is used to administer analog sets. in the following example, unit 0 is configured on this card with DN 8000. we specify REQ NEW with a TYPE of 500.
LD 10
REQ NEW
TYPE 500
TN 6 0
CDEN
DES ANLG00
CUST 0
WRLS
DN 8000
MARP
CPND
VMB
AST
IAPG 0
HUNT
TGAR 0
LDN NO
NCOS 0
RNPG 0
SGRP 0
CLS
SCI 0
MLWU_LANG
PLEV 02
FTR

configuring a station on NT8D02 digital line card

consider that we have an NT8D02 digital line card in slot 5. LD 11 is used to administer digital sets. in the following example, a M2008 set on unit 0 has DN 7000 configured on KEY 0. we specify REQ NEW with a TYPE of 2008. notice that since the phone has multiple keys, you assign a DN to a key rather than to an entire phone as is the case for an analog set.
LD 11
REQ NEW
TYPE 2008
TN 5 0
DES DGTL00
CUST 0
FDN
TGAR 0
LDN NO
NCOS 0
RNPG 0
SSU
SGRP 0
CLS
HUNT
SCI 0
PLEV 02
AST
IAPG 0
MLWU_LANG
DNDR 0
KEY 00 SCR 7000
MARP
CPND
VMB

setting up trunks to cisco mc 3810: t1 cas

once we get the meridian set up with some local analog and digital sets, of course the next thing is to configure some trunks. a nick easy way to get a t1 trunk up quickly is to use cas signaling. i dont really use cas any longer on my network but it is definitely as easy as it gets as far as setting up digital trunks. the scenario is as follows.

[t1 cas network diagram]

cisco mc 3810 with avm and mft t1 card. mft t1 card is connected to nortel 1.5 mb dti/pri card in slot 2 of the meridian using cas. the meridian will be providing network clock for the t1 span.

when this is all said and done, a user on the nortel can dial an extension on the cisco by dialing 9, then the 4 digit extension number of a phone on the cisco side (e.g. 9000). on the cisco side, a user can dial an extension on the nortel by dialing the 4 digit extension number of a phone on the nortel side (e.g. 7000 or 8000).
before we even talk about software we first have to consider cabling between the cisco and the switch. refer to the table below; this will give us a crossover cable. RJ45 pins are counted by pointing RJ45 jack, pins end away from you, clasp facing bottom. pin 1 will be the pin furthest to your left, pin 8 will be the pin furthest to your right. cable from 66 block pin to RJ45 pin; the nortel pin numbers and signal identifiers are just given for reference.
nortel pin66 block pinRJ45 pinsignal
23461R
24484R1
48452T
49475T1
assume we start out with a clean configuration: no digital data block, digital loops, d channels, etc. defined. use the procedure above to clear out the switch if in question. for the purpose of this example there is a dti/pri card with a clock and controller and dchi daughterboard (unused here) installed in slot 2 of the meridian.
step 1: create digital data block. we only need to do this once on a system. basically it is just used to establish a TRSH table, which is just a table full of threshold settings mostly for error counters. this is also where you define your clock controller later. here we just use all default values for the threshold set (just hit return).
>LD 73
DDB000 
UDATA: 31988 1  PDATA: 101492 5 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  NEW
TYPE DDB
TRSH 0
RALM 
BIPC 
LFAC 
BIPV 
SRTK 
SRNT 
LFAL 
SRIM 
SRMM 
TRSH 

UDATA: 31988 1  PDATA: 101460 5 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  ****

>
OVL000 
>
step 2: define the dti/pri card in slot 2 of the meridian by configuring a digital loop for it in the common equipment settings (LD 17)
>LD 17
CFN000 
UDATA: 32244 1  PDATA: 101105 15 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

DCH  AVAIL:    64    USED:     0    TOT:    64
AML  AVAIL:    16    USED:     0    TOT:    16
REQ  CHG
TYPE CEQU
TDS  
CONF 
DLOP 2 24 ESF      (note we are using all 24 channels for voice)
MODE PRI           (even though this says PRI, just trust that it will work in CAS mode)
LCMT B8S
YALM FDL
TRSH 0
DLOP 
MTYP 

UDATA: 32116 1  PDATA: 101020 15 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

DCH  AVAIL:    64    USED:     0    TOT:    64
AML  AVAIL:    16    USED:     0    TOT:    16
REQ  ****

>
OVL000 
>
step 3: define the clock controller on our dti/pri card in slot 2 in the digital data block.
>LD 73
DDB000 
UDATA: 32116 1  PDATA: 101020 15 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  CHG
TYPE DDB
CLKN 2
PREF               (just hit return, nortel defaults to free run, it will be clock master for the span)
SREF 
TRSH 0
RALM 
BIPC 
LFAC 
BIPV 
SRTK 
SRNT 
LFAL 
SRIM 
SRMM 
TRSH 

UDATA: 32116 1  PDATA: 101020 15 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  ****

>
OVL000 
>
step 4: enable the dti/pri card in slot 2 of the meridian
>LD 60
DTI000 
.ENLL 2

PRI000 2 5 
PRI000 2 5 
DTA021 2 
DTI030 2 
.****
>
OVL000 
>
step 5: create a route for the dti/pri card. it will be a direct inward dial (did) trunk which makes this easy to set up because basically how it works is the user dials an access code, gets on a trunk, and the PBX just forwards out what digits the user dials to the trunk. conversely when the cisco gets a call that it needs to send on to the pbx, it just sends out the digits it gets over the trunk to the PBX subject to any stripping rules we set up.
>LD 16
RDB000 
UDATA: 32116 2  PDATA: 101012 15 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  NEW
TYPE RDB
CUST 0
DMOD 
ROUT 20
TKTP DID    (as above this makes the dial plan easy just matches incoming digits)
M911_ANI
SAT  NO
RCLS EXT
DTRK YES
DGTP DTI
DSEL VCE
PTYP        (hit return default is PRI, it works for us)
AUTO NO
DNIS NO
IANI 
ICOG IAO    (in and out)
RANX
SRCH LIN
TRMB YES
STEP 
ACOD 9      (dial 9 to get on a trunk in this route)
CPP
TARG 0      (no restriction on this trunk)
BILN NO
SGRP 
OABS 
INST 
CNTL YES
TIMR ICF 512
        512 
TIMR OGF 512
        512 
TIMR EOD 13952
        13952 
TIMR DSI 34944
        34944 
TIMR NRD 10112
        10112 
TIMR DDL 70
        70 
TIMR ODT 4096
        4096 
TIMR RGV 640
        640 
TIMR GRD 896
        896 
TIMR SFB 3
        3 
TIMR 
SST  5 0
NEDC ORG
FEDC ORG
CPDC NO
DLTN NO
HOLD 02 02 40
SEIZ 02 02
SVFL 02 02
DRNG NO
CDR  NO
MUS  NO
MR   NO
EQAR NO
OHQ  NO
OHQT 00
TTBL 0
OHTD NO
PLEV 2
MCTS 
ALRM NO

UDATA: 32116 2  PDATA: 100880 15 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  
SCH0101 
REQ  ****

>
step 6: add a trunk to the route. we create a single DID trunk consisting of the first channel of the t1 span.
>LD 14
TRK000 
UDATA: 32116 2  PDATA: 100880 15 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   172    USED:    28    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID    (DID to match the route we just created)
TN   2 1
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 1   (first member of route 20 trunk group, matches route number from step 5)
NITE 
SIGL EM4    (4 wire e&m signalling matches cisco)
STRI WNK    (e&m wink start signalling matches on cisco)
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 01     RT  20     MB  1     

UDATA: 31948 2  PDATA: 100842 15 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   171    USED:    29    TOT:   200
REQ  ****

>
OVL000 
>
step 7: add the rest of the trunks to the route (big datafill!) just repeat what we did in step (6) 23 more times..
>LD 14
TRK000 
UDATA: 31932 1  PDATA: 100842 2 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   171    USED:    29    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 2
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 2
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 02     RT  20     MB  2     

UDATA: 31840 1  PDATA: 100797 4 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   170    USED:    30    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 3
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 3
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 03     RT  20     MB  3     

UDATA: 31748 1  PDATA: 100752 6 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   169    USED:    31    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 4
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 4
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 04     RT  20     MB  4     

UDATA: 31656 1  PDATA: 100707 8 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 
TNS     AVAIL:   168    USED:    32    TOT:   200
REQ NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 5
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 5
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 05     RT  20     MB  5     

UDATA: 31564 1  PDATA: 100662 8 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   167    USED:    33    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 6
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 6
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 06     RT  20     MB  6     

UDATA: 31472 1  PDATA: 100617 8 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   166    USED:    34    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 7
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 7
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 07     RT  20     MB  7     

UDATA: 31380 1  PDATA: 100572 8 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   165    USED:    35    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 8
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 7

SCH0224 
RTMB 20 8
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 08     RT  20     MB  8     

UDATA: 31288 1  PDATA: 100527 8 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   164    USED:    36    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 9
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 8

SCH0224 
RTMB 20 9
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 09     RT  20     MB  9     

UDATA: 31196 1  PDATA: 100482 8 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   163    USED:    37    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 10
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 10
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 10     RT  20     MB  10     

UDATA: 31104 1  PDATA: 100437 9 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   162    USED:    38    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 11
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 11
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 11     RT  20     MB  11     

UDATA: 31012 1  PDATA: 100392 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   161    USED:    39    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 12
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 12
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 12     RT  20     MB  12     

UDATA: 30920 1  PDATA: 100347 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   160    USED:    40    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID 
TN   2 13
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 13
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 13     RT  20     MB  13     

UDATA: 30828 1  PDATA: 100302 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   159    USED:    41    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 14
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 14
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 14     RT  20     MB  14     

UDATA: 30736 1  PDATA: 100257 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   158    USED:    42    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 15
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 15
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 15     RT  20     MB  15     

UDATA: 30644 1  PDATA: 100212 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   157    USED:    43    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 16
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 16
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 16     RT  20     MB  16     

UDATA: 30551 1  PDATA: 100167 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   156    USED:    44    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 17
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 17
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 17     RT  20     MB  17     

UDATA: 30459 1  PDATA: 100122 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   155    USED:    45    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 18
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 18
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 18     RT  20     MB  18     

UDATA: 30367 1  PDATA: 100077 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   154    USED:    46    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 19
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 19
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 19     RT  20     MB  19     

UDATA: 30275 1  PDATA: 100032 11 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   153    USED:    47    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 20
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 20
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 20     RT  20     MB  20     

UDATA: 30183 1  PDATA: 099987 12 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   152    USED:    48    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 21
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 21
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 21     RT  20     MB  21     

UDATA: 30091 1  PDATA: 099942 12 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   151    USED:    49    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 22
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 22
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 22     RT  20     MB  22     

UDATA: 29999 1  PDATA: 099897 14 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   150    USED:    50    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 23
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 23
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 23     RT  20     MB  23     

UDATA: 29907 1  PDATA: 099852 14 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   149    USED:    51    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 24
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 24
NITE 
SIGL EM4
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  002 24     RT  20     MB  24     

UDATA: 29815 1  PDATA: 099807 14 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   148    USED:    52    TOT:   200
REQ  ****

>
that should basically do it for the nortel, we might have to kick the trunk card with DISL 2/ENLL 2 in LD 60 on the nortel, or a shut/no shut on controller t1 0 on the cisco, or power cycle one device or the other, but the t1 link should come up and work great with this config.
so now the cisco configuration. i will just post the pertinent parts of the configuration as relating to the t1 part of things. it is really fairly simple. we configure our t1 controller in cas mode and create a ds0-group that contains all of the timeslots. the cisco generates a voice-port 0:1 to represent the t1. we route calls to the pbx using dial-peers with various patterns consisting of a trunk access code and an extension of the pbx.

voice-ports 1/5 and 1/6 are just fxs ports on the avm in the cisco. i have a test phone hooked up to the fxs port 1/6 at extension 9000.

note that the cisco is taking network clock from the nortel on the t1 span. also note that we use forward-digits 4 in the dial peer to forward the full four digit extension that was dialed to the meridian.

! the network-clock base-rate parameter can be excluded and it will still work
network-clock base-rate 56k
!
voice service voip 
 sip
  session transport tcp
!
no voice confirmation-tone
!
!
controller T1 0
 mode cas
 framing esf
 linecode b8zs
 ds0-group 1 timeslots 1-24 type e&m-wink-start
 description t1 to meridian
!
!
voice-port 0:1
!
voice-port 1/5
!
voice-port 1/6
 description test phone on fxs port
!
!
!
dial-peer voice 9000 pots
 destination-pattern 9000
 port 1/6
!         
dial-peer voice 7000 pots
 destination-pattern 7...
 supplementary-service pass-through
 port 0:1
 forward-digits 4
!
dial-peer voice 8000 pots
 destination-pattern 8...
 supplementary-service pass-through
 port 0:1
 forward-digits 4
!
sip-ua 
 retry invite 3
 retry response 3
 retry bye 3
 retry cancel 3
 timers trying 1000
 timers notify 1000
 timers info 1000
!
!
gatekeeper
 shutdown    

setting up trunks to cisco mc 3810: e&m tie lines

now i will discuss a more hypothetical configuration of some e&m trunks between the nortel and the cisco. i have had this wired up at various points in time but never got it quite working. i think it is mostly correct save for a few tweaks. the scenario looks as follows

[t1 cas network diagram]

cisco mc 3810 with avm and mft t1 card. mft t1 card is unused in this case. 4 e&m trunks are used to connect the avm on the cisco and an e&m trunk card in slot 3 of the meridian.

we will begin with the configuration that needs to be added to the nortel meridian for e&m and then move on to the cisco configuration. but again before even getting to programming anything we first must cable things up according to the table below. this should in theory give us a six wire e&m cable with signalling wires crossed over for back to back use. again cable from 66 block pin to RJ45 pin; the nortel pin numbers are just given for reference. RJ45 pin numbers are given relative to pin side facing away from you, clasp facing down, pin 1 will then be that which is leftmost.
nortel signalnortel pin66 block pinRJ45 pincisco signal
M367E
T1125T1
R1244R1
R2733R
T2616T
E2852M
you can cable up the other 3 units of e&m on this card using the same pattern. each unit takes up 8 positions on the 66 block; we skip pins 7 and 8 in this particular wiring arrangement. so the second unit will run from pin 9-16 on the 66 block, the third unit will run from 17-24 on the 66 block, and the fourth unit will run from 25-32 on the 66 block.
step 1: create another route data block for the e&m lines. we have to do it as a tie line; the e&m trunks do not support direct inward dial.
>LD 16
RDB000 
UDATA: 32040 1  PDATA: 101597 1 
SCH5066 


REQ  NEW
TYPE RDB
CUST 0
DMOD 
ROUT 10
TKTP TIE
ESN  NO
CNVT NO
SAT  NO
RCLS EXT
DTRK NO
PTYP ATT
AUTO NO
DNIS 
IANI 
ICOG IAO
SRCH LIN
TRMB YES
STEP 
ACOD 9      (dial 9 to access this trunk)
TARG 0
BILN 
SGRP 
OABS 
INST 
ANTK 
SIGO STD
STYP SDAT
CNTL YES
TIMR ICF 512
        512 
TIMR OGF 512
        512 
TIMR EOD 13952
        13952 
TIMR DSI 34944
        34944 
TIMR NRD 10112
        10112 
TIMR DDL 0
        0 
TIMR ODT 4096
        4096 
TIMR RGV 640
        640 
TIMR SFB 3
        3 
TIMR TFD 0
	0
TIMR
SST  5 7
NEDC ETH
FEDC ETH
CPDC NO
DLTN YES
HOLD 02 02 40
SEIZ 02 02
SVFL 02 02
DRNG NO
CDR  NO
MUS  NO
MANO NO
EQAR NO
OHQ  
OHQT 
CBQ  
AUTH
TTBL 0
OHTD NO
PLEV 2
ALRM NO

UDATA: 32040 1  PDATA: 101312 1 
SCH5066 


REQ  ****

>
step 2: add a single e&m trunk line to the route we just created. we use 4 wire e&m which matches what is set on the cisco. we set e&m type 1 on the nortel which according to cisco matches type V on their equipment, which is what we will use on the mc3810. wink start signalling is used for this link and is configured to match on both devices.
>LD 14
TRK000 
UDATA: 32040 1  PDATA: 101312 1 
SCH5066 


TNS     AVAIL:   178    USED:    22    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE TIE
TN   3 0
XTRK XEM
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 10 1
MNDN 
TGAR 0
SIGL EM4
EMTY TY1
CPAD COUT
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  UNR DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL MID
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  003 0 00 01     RT  10     MB  1     

UDATA: 31881 1  PDATA: 101274 1 
SCH5066 


TNS     AVAIL:   177    USED:    23    TOT:   200
REQ  ****

>
step 3: stat the trunk then kick it with DISC 3/ENLC 3 to reinitialize things. then stat the trunk again to make sure that it is up.
>LD 32
NPR000 
.STAT 3
00 = UNIT 00 = IDLE          (TRK)(TIE EM4W WNK /WNK )
01 = UNIT 01 = UNEQ 
02 = UNIT 02 = UNEQ 
03 = UNIT 03 = UNEQ 
.DISC 3

.ENLC 3

XMI001 3  XEM 
XMI002 3  XEM 
.STAT 3
00 = UNIT 00 = IDLE          (TRK)(TIE EM4W WNK /WNK )
01 = UNIT 01 = UNEQ 
02 = UNIT 02 = UNEQ 
03 = UNIT 03 = UNEQ 
.****
.
>
OVL000 
>
step 4: add the other 3 units of e&m trunk on the nt8d15 card. exact same procedure as we followed for the first trunk unit, just increment the route member number each time.
> LD 14
TRK000 
UDATA: 31809 1  PDATA: 101210 1 
SCH5066 


TNS     AVAIL:   177    USED:    23    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE TIE
TN   3 1
XTRK  XEM
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 10 2
MNDN 
TGAR 0
SIGL EM4
EMTY TY1
CPAD COUT
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  UNR DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL MID
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  003 0 00 01     RT  10     MB  2     

UDATA: 31726 1  PDATA: 101173 3 
SCH5066 


TNS     AVAIL:   176    USED:    24    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE TIE
TN   3 2
XTRK  XEM
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 10 3
MNDN 
TGAR 0
SIGL EM4
EMTY TY1
CPAD COUT
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  UNR DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL MID
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  003 0 00 02     RT  10     MB  3     

UDATA: 31643 1  PDATA: 101136 3 
SCH5066 


TNS     AVAIL:   175    USED:    25    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE TIE
TN   3 3
XTRK  XEM
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 10 4
MNDN 
TGAR 0
SIGL EM4
EMTY TY1
CPAD COUT
STRI WNK
STRO WNK
SUPN YES
CLS  UNR DTN ECD WTA LPR APN THFD P10 VNL MID
TKID 

NEW TRK    TN  003 0 00 03     RT  10     MB  4     

UDATA: 31560 1  PDATA: 101099 5 
SCH5066 


TNS     AVAIL:   174    USED:    26    TOT:   200
REQ ****
>
OVL000 
>
step 5: so now we should have a route with four member trunk lines. bounce the card with ENLC 3/DISC 3 and check their status to make sure everything is ok
>LD 32
NPR000 
.STAT 3
00 = UNIT 00 = BUSY          (TRK)(TIE EM4W WNK /WNK )
01 = UNIT 01 = IDLE          (TRK)(TIE EM4W WNK /WNK )
02 = UNIT 02 = IDLE          (TRK)(TIE EM4W WNK /WNK )
03 = UNIT 03 = IDLE          (TRK)(TIE EM4W WNK /WNK )
.DISC 3

.ENLC 3

XMI001 3  XEM 
XMI002 3  XEM 
.STAT 3
00 = UNIT 00 = IDLE          (TRK)(TIE EM4W WNK /WNK )
01 = UNIT 01 = IDLE          (TRK)(TIE EM4W WNK /WNK )
02 = UNIT 02 = IDLE          (TRK)(TIE EM4W WNK /WNK )
03 = UNIT 03 = IDLE          (TRK)(TIE EM4W WNK /WNK )
.****
>
OVL000 
>
that should do it as far as the nortel goes; here is the cisco-side configuration as pertains to the e&m trunks.
trunk group  EMTRKGRP
 description e+m trunks to meridian
!
!
voice-port 1/1
 trunk-group EMTRKGRP
 operation 4-wire
 type 5
 description EMTRKGRP01
!
voice-port 1/2
 trunk-group EMTRKGRP
 operation 4-wire
 type 5
 description EMTRKGRP02
!
voice-port 1/3
 trunk-group EMTRKGRP
 operation 4-wire
 type 5
 description EMTRKGRP03
!
voice-port 1/4
 trunk-group EMTRKGRP
 operation 4-wire
 type 5
 description EMTRKGRP04
!         
voice-port 1/5
!
voice-port 1/6
 description test phone on fxs port
!
!
dial-peer voice 9000 pots
 destination-pattern 9000
 port 1/6
!
dial-peer voice 7000 pots
 trunkgroup EMTRKGRP
 destination-pattern 7...
 no digit-strip
 forward-digits 4
!
dial-peer voice 8000 pots
 trunkgroup EMTRKGRP
 destination-pattern 8...
 no digit-strip
 forward-digits 4
!         

setting up trunks to cisco mc 3810: t1 pri

this configuration works great and i have migrated all my t1 trunks on my meridian to isdn pri. there are definitely some added complexities in configuring t1 pri versus t1 cas and i will discuss them in detail below. assume again that we are starting with basically a clean slate with no previously defined digital loops, d channels, trunks, routes, clock controllers, and so forth. the scenario appears as follows.

[pri network diagram]
the isdn switch-type will be NI-2. the cisco will act as the network side and the nortel will act as the user side. the nortel will provide clock for the network link. for simplicity, we are configuring the trunk as a direct inward dial trunk rather than a tie trunk.
i do want to state explicitly that the t1 card in this case is pinned out exactly the same as in the t1 cas case above so just follow that wiring plan if the card hasnt been wired up yet.
before we proceed i do want to note that the nortel is equipped with a ddch card in this scenario. i also tried various t1 pri configurations between the cisco and the nortel when the nortel was equipped with a dchi card instead of a ddch card and was never able to make it work. once i swapped in the ddch card, it started working pretty quickly. i got lucky and got my ddch card for really cheap but since dchi cards are so much cheaper to get i would be really curious to hear if any other folks out there have been able to get it working with a dchi card. it should in theory be possible to do.
we will start out configuring the meridian, and then move along to the cisco.
step 1: create digital data block. we do it the very same way as we do for the t1 cas configuration. if you already have a DDB 0 created then you can skip this step.
>LD 73
DDB000 
UDATA: 31988 1  PDATA: 101492 5 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  NEW
TYPE DDB
TRSH 0
RALM 
BIPC 
LFAC 
BIPV 
SRTK 
SRNT 
LFAL 
SRIM 
SRMM 
TRSH 

UDATA: 31988 1  PDATA: 101460 5 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  ****

>
OVL000 
>
step 2: define digital loops
>LD 17
CFN000 
UDATA: 31908 1  PDATA: 101436 7 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

DCH  AVAIL:    64    USED:     0    TOT:    64
AML  AVAIL:    16    USED:     0    TOT:    16
REQ  CHG
TYPE CEQU
TDS  
CONF 
DLOP 02 23 ESF     (note only 23 channels; channel 24 is the d-channel)
MODE PRI
LCMT B8S
YALM FDL
TRSH 0
DLOP 
MTYP 

UDATA: 31652 1  PDATA: 101266 7 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

DCH  AVAIL:    64    USED:     0    TOT:    64
AML  AVAIL:    16    USED:     0    TOT:    16
REQ  
REQ  ****

>
OVL000 
>
step 3: define clock controller. we can skip this step if we already have at least one dti/pri card installed with an active clock controller already.
>LD 73
DDB000 
UDATA: 31732 1  PDATA: 101266 5 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  CHG
TYPE DDB
CLKN 2
PREF       (default is nortel acts as clock master for the span)
SREF 
TRSH 0
RALM 
BIPC 
LFAC 
BIPV 
SRTK 
SRNT 
LFAL 
SRIM 
SRMM 
TRSH 

UDATA: 31732 1  PDATA: 101266 5 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

DTC014 
REQ  ****

>
OVL000 
>
step 4: create an adan record for the d-channel
>LD 17
CFN000 UDATA: 31732 1  PDATA: 101266 5 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

DCH  AVAIL:    64    USED:     0    TOT:    64
AML  AVAIL:    16    USED:     0    TOT:    16
REQ  CHG
TYPE ADAN
ADAN NEW DCH 10
CTYP MSDL
CDNO 2
  PORT 1
DES  MC3810PRI
USR  PRI
IFC  NI2
CO TYPE
DCHL 2
PRI  
OTBF 32
DRAT 64KC
SIDE
CNEG
RLS  
RCAP 
MBGA NO
NASA 
TIMR YES
T310 10

LAPD YES
T23  
T200 3
T203 10
N200 3
N201 260
K    7

UDATA: 30658 1  PDATA: 101125 5 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

DCH  AVAIL:    63    USED:     1    TOT:    64
AML  AVAIL:    16    USED:     0    TOT:    16

ADAN DATA SAVED
ADAN 

REQ  ****

>
OVL000 
>
step 5: enable dti/pri cards.
>LD 60
DTI000 
.ENL *
.ENLL 2

PRI000 2 5 
PRI000 2 5 
DTA023 2 
OK
.****
>
step 6: bring up the d channel. first we may have to enable the ddch card and download the pri code to the ddch board (if this has not already happened before). then we can enable the d channel itself.
>LD 96
DCH000 
.ENL MSDL 10


DOWNLOADING PRIE
REASON: NONE ON CARD

OVL021 IDLE 
SDL100 BUSY
OVL021 BKGD 
SDL100 BUSY...............................
....................................

SDL000 PRIE ( MSDL 10), VERSION 46, MAINT MODE. 
DOWNLOADING NI2 DATA
REASON: NONE ON CARD
...
SDL000 NI02 ( MSDL 10), VERSION 6, MAINT MODE. 
OK 
.ENL DCH 10
.
DCH: 10  EST CONFIRM  TIME: 20:00:58  1/04/1993  

DCH: 10  EST REMOTE   TIME: 20:00:58  1/04/1993  

DCH000 
.****
>
step 7: enable isdn in the customer record. if it is not, adding the route in the next step will fail. note that we leave HNPA and HNXX blank. this makes the meridian just send a 4-digit outbound CLID for the calling party. if HNPA and HNXX are specified, you get 10-digit outbound CLID for the calling party that will look like HNPA-HNXX-EXTN. the important thing is mostly that whatever you choose here lines up with the dial peers that get created later on the cisco.
if an ISDN data block already exists with HNPA and HNXX defined, they can be removed by doing a CHG on the NET_DATA and specifying "X" for HNPA and HNXX when prompted. unlike other cases on the meridian where to remove a numeric value you specify the numeric value prefixed by "X" when prompted, here you just specify the X alone.
>LD 15
CDB000 
UDATA: 30530 1  PDATA: 100923 1 
SCH5066 


REQ: CHG
TYPE: NET

TYPE NET_DATA
CUST 0
OPT 
AC2 
ISDN YES
SCH4779 
  PNI 
  PINX_DN 
  MBG 
  BSGC 
  HNPA      ( this would show up as your area code in the sent CLID )
  HNXX      ( this would show up as your NPA in the sent CLID )
  HLOC 
  LSC 
  CNTP 
  RCNT 
  PSTN 
  TNDM 
  PCMC 
  SATD 
VNR 
NIT 
FOPT 

UDATA: 30530 1  PDATA: 100923 1 
SCH5066 


REQ: 
step 8: define a LDN0 in the customer record with length equivalent to the number of digits you expect to come in over the trunk for inbound calls. you can just make up some DN to put here so long as the length is good. apparently you have to have an LDN0 defined for ISDN PRI DID to work.
>LD 15
CDB000 
UDATA: 156335 0  PDATA: 229411 0 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ: CHG
TYPE: LDN_DATA
CUST 0
OPT 
DLDN 
LDN0 5555
LDN1 
ICI 

UDATA: 156335 0  PDATA: 229373 2 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ: ****

>
OVL000 
>
step 9: add route data block
>LD 16
RDB000 
UDATA: 30658 1  PDATA: 101125 5 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  NEW
TYPE RDB
CUST 0
DMOD 
ROUT 20
TKTP DID
M911_ANI  
SAT  NO
RCLS EXT
DTRK YES
DGTP PRI
ISDN YES 
MODE PRA
IFC  NI2
PNI  00000
NCNA YES
NCRD NO
CHTY BCH
ISAR NO
DSEL VOD
PTYP PRI
AUTO NO
DNIS NO
DCDR NO
IANI 
ICOG IAO
RANX NO
SRCH LIN
TRMB YES
STEP 
ACOD 9      (dial 9 to access this trunk)
TCPP NO
TARG 0
BILN NO
SGRP 0
OABS 
INST 
CNTL YES
TIMR 
DRNG NO
CDR  NO
NATL
MUS  NO
EQAR NO
OHQ  NO
OHQT 00
TTBL 0
PLEV 2
MCTS NO
ALRM NO

UDATA: 30658 1  PDATA: 100969 6 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

REQ  
SCH0101 
REQ  ****

>
OVL000 
>
step 10: add trunk data block. basically repeat this command for unit 1 to 23 on the dti/pri card, incrementing the route member number each time. i will spare you the full text of two lengthy datafills of this nature on this page since you have basically seen it before in the t1 cas section above.
>LD 14
TRK000 
UDATA: 30582 1  PDATA: 100961 9 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   178    USED:    22    TOT:   200
REQ  NEW
TYPE DID
TN   2 1
CUST 0
NCOS 0
RTMB 20 1

B-CHANNEL SIGNALING 
NITE 
CLS  
TKID

NEW TRK    TN  002 01     RT  20     MB  1     

UDATA: 30490 1  PDATA: 100923 10 
DISK RECS AVAIL: 512 

TNS     AVAIL:   177    USED:    23    TOT:   200
REQ  

SCH0101 
REQ  ****

>
that should do it as far as the meridian side of things goes. here is the corresponding cisco configuration.
!
isdn switch-type primary-qsig
isdn gateway-max-interworking
!
!
!
voice service voip 
 sip
  session transport tcp
!
!
no voice confirmation-tone
!
!
controller T1 0
 framing esf
 linecode b8zs
 clock source internal
 ds0-group timeslots 1-24 fxs-loop-start
 description t1 to channel bank
!
controller T1 1
 framing esf
 linecode b8zs
 pri-group timeslots 1-24
 description t1 to meridian
!
! the following is the configuration for the d-channel
!
! set the guard timer to be as long as possible and make
! sure the T310 counter (in seconds) matches the value set
! on the meridian in the ADAN record for the DCH. note that
! the cisco and meridian use different units of time for
! specifying the T310 value.
!
interface Serial1:23
 no ip address
 no logging event link-status
 logging event nfas-status
 logging event subif-link-status
 isdn switch-type primary-ni
 isdn protocol-emulate network
 isdn incoming-voice voice
 isdn guard-timer 20000
 isdn T310 10000
 isdn send-alerting
 no cdp enable
!
!
voice-port 0:1
!
! meridian defaults to bearer capacity speech so we use that.
!
voice-port 1:23
 bearer-cap Speech
!
!
! a note on the dial peers below. they serve two purposes. the first
! of course is to route incoming calls to the meridian. simple enough.
! but the second is more nuanced. basically, per cisco documentation
! on one stage and two stage dialing over isdn pri, these destination
! patterns are also used to tag incoming calls from meridian 7XXX and
! 8XXX extensions such that the cisco will treat them as DIDs.
!
! the cisco basically looks at the incoming CLID and wants to see it
! matching a pots dial-peer with the direct-inward-dial keyword. since
! we did not define a HNPA and HNXX in LD 15 NET_DATA when configuring
! the nortel, both devices are using 4-digit CLIDs throughout and the
! dial peers given below work as intended (one stage dialing).
!
! now, if we had configured a HNPA and HNXX on the nortel, it would be
! sending a 10-digit calling party CLID of NPA-NXX-EXTN. the four
! digit dial peers on the cisco will nominally work for inbound calls
! to the nortel because of our digit stripping rules, but they do not
! result in proper DID treatment for calls outbound from the meridian
! to the cisco. 
!
! the resulting improper treatment is that it will work, but there is
! a quirk for the user. they basically dial the access code plus their
! number on the nortel, and they will land on a second dial tone from
! the cisco. it just throws away any digits they dialed subsequent to
! the trunk access code. at this point they will have to dial their
! number again at this dial tone to actually have their call go through
! (two stage dialing).
!
! in that case, we would have had to define 10-digit destination patterns
! in our dial peers e.g. destination-pattern NPANXX7... or NPANXX8... such
! that the proper treatment for calls outbound from the meridian to the
! cisco would occur.
!
! you can use the debug isdn q931 command on the cisco or ENL MSGI and ENL
! MSGO in LD 96 on the nortel to see what both sides think the calling and
! called party numbers are.
!
dial-peer voice 7000 pots
 destination-pattern 7...
 supplementary-service pass-through
 direct-inward-dial
 port 1:23
 forward-digits 4
!
dial-peer voice 8000 pots
 destination-pattern 8...
 supplementary-service pass-through
 direct-inward-dial
 port 1:23
 forward-digits 4
!
dial-peer voice 9000 pots
 destination-pattern 9000
 port 0:1
!
sip-ua 
 retry invite 3
 retry response 3
 retry bye 3
 retry cancel 3
 timers trying 1000
 timers notify 1000
 timers info 1000
!
!
gatekeeper
 shutdown
!
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